December 28, 2012
MINING BRINGING EXPATS BACK TO NOVA SCOTIA
“Home for the holidays and hopefully forever”

Nova Scotia’s mining industry is creating opportunities for Nova Scotians to stay in the province and to come back home from away.

Doug Keating worked everywhere from the Northwest Territories to Newfoundland to Saskatchewan until he saw an ad for his current job – manager of Ressources Appalaches’ Dufferin gold mine in Port Dufferin. He moved back home to Nova Scotia earlier this year and is now at the forefront of what some have called a potential “mini gold rush” in the province.

Ressources Appalaches expects to start production at the Dufferin mine in 2013. The company will create 50-65 jobs in the next several years, almost all of which will be filled by Nova Scotians.

“I am home for the holidays and hopefully forever,” said Doug Keating. “Mining companies like Ressources Appalaches make it possible for thousands of Nova Scotians like me to work in this province. All we need is a little support from the provincial government, like extending the fuel tax rebate to the mining industry, to create more jobs in rural areas.”

“Giving the mining industry the rebate would allow us to create more jobs in the rural areas that so desperately need good news these days,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia. “The government should treat all resource industries the same. The government should help all resource industries grow, create jobs and invest in Nova Scotia.”

The provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other natural resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and off-highway forestry vehicles. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry, but is the only province that does not give it to mining.

The fuel tax harms the province’s mining industry in two main ways: 1) It makes mining in Nova Scotia more expensive compared to other provinces and hurts Nova Scotia’s mineral exports; and 2) it discourages mining companies from investing in Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

December 17, 2012
SAME VEHICLE, SAME PURPOSE, DIFFERENT TAX TREATMENT
“I can’t see the difference. Can you see the difference?”

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is holding a news conference today to highlight that the provincial government taxes vehicles differently based simply on who owns them.

At Atlantic Cat’s Burnside facility, MANS representatives will explain that an excavator, for example, building a road in the woods for a forestry company gets the off-highway fuel tax rebate, but the
same excavator building a road in the woods for a mining company does not get the rebate. MANS is using a well-known laundry detergent commercial tagline to highlight that there is no difference
between the excavators except the unfair tax treatment.

“I can’t see the difference. Can you see the difference?” asked Pat Mills, President of MANS. “The only difference between these two excavators is that the government treats mining unfairly
compared to other resource industries. If a forestry company owns it, it gets the fuel tax rebate. If a mining company owns it, it does not get the rebate.”

“The same vehicle, doing the same work, should be taxed the same,” said Sean Kirby, MANS’ Executive Director. “Nova Scotia is the only province in the country that treats mining this way.”

Provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other natural resource industries a tax rebate for fuel
used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and forestry excavators. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry, but is the only province that does not give it to mining and quarrying.

MANS launched its “Fuel Tax Fairness” campaign in October.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

December 10, 2012
MANS: “ONE OF THESE THINGS IS NOT LIKE THE OTHERS”
Mining treated unfairly compared to fishing, farming and forestry

The mining and quarrying industry is using a Sesame Street classic to remind the provincial government about the importance of treating everyone fairly.

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia held a news conference today to highlight that the Nova Scotia government gives other resource industries the off-highway fuel tax rebate but is the only province that does not give it to mining and quarrying.

At Conrad Brothers’ quarry in Dartmouth, a fishing boat, farm tractor and forestry harvester were grouped together and a mining haul truck was placed off to the side to illustrate that Nova Scotia gives other resource industries the off-highway fuel tax rebate but is the only province that does not give it to mining and quarrying. Cards passed out to media said: “One of these things is not like the others! None of these vehicles drive on public roads but only one of them has to pay tax on the fuel it uses. Can you guess which one?”

“We teach our kids that they should treat everyone fairly but the government is not treating mining and quarrying fairly,” said Pat Mills, President of MANS. “Other resource industries get a rebate for fuel used in vehicles that don’t use public roads. The mining industry should get it too.”

“Fuel tax is supposed to be a user-pay system,” said MANS Executive Director Sean Kirby. “Mining vehicles that don’t use public roads should be treated the same as other resource industry vehicles that don’t use public roads. Even kids know that everyone should be treated the same.”

MANS also released a video version of today’s news release at www.youtube.com/MiningNS.

MANS launched its “Fuel Tax Fairness” campaign in October.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

November 19, 2012
MANS: BILL 99 IS “THE GREAT ONE”
Legislation would give mining industry the fuel tax rebate

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is handing out some unusual hockey pucks to promote a bill that would give mining and quarrying the same fuel tax rebate that other resource industries get.

The pucks have “Bill 99 – The Great One” written on them, in reference to both the legislative number of the bill and Wayne Gretzky’s jersey number and nickname.

“Bill 99 is ‘The Great One,’” said Pat Mills, President of MANS. “It would help the mining industry grow and create jobs in rural areas. It would treat mining fairly compared to other resource industries.”

“We are asking the government to pass Bill 99 during the fall session of the legislature,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “The government should act now to help all resource industries create jobs, especially in the rural areas that so desperately need support.”

Bill 99 was tabled in the legislature on October 25 by Progressive Conservative MLA Alfie MacLeod. The Bill’s explanatory note says it “exempts the mining industry from the gasoline and diesel oil tax in the same way as the fishing, farming and forestry industries are exempted.”

The Nova Scotia Liberal Caucus issued a statement on October 17 in support of giving the rebate to mining.

The provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other natural resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and off-highway forestry vehicles. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry, but is the only province that does not give it to mining.

Including mining in the off-highway fuel tax rebate would cost the government approximately $2.6 million per year. It would apply to a range of vehicles that operate on mine sites, such as haul trucks and excavators, most of which never leave the mines and are not allowed to drive on public roads.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

November 13, 2012
FUEL TAX REBATE CAMPAIGN GOES BACK TO THE SALT MINE
"Not only do these vehicles not use public roads, they don't even drive on the earth's surface"

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is taking reporters to an underground salt mine today as part of its campaign to get the fuel tax rebate that the provincial government gives other resource industries.

"Provincial fuel tax is essentially a user-pay system. Mining vehicles that don't use public roads should not have to help pay for them," said Pat Mills, President of MANS. "Not only do these vehicles not use public roads, they don't even drive on the earth's surface."

"The government gives other resource industries a rebate for fuel used in vehicles that don't drive on roads, such as fishing boats and farm tractors" said Sean Kirby, MANS' Executive Director. "All we are asking is to get the same rebate, for the same reason."

The Canadian Salt Company's mine in Pugwash, which goes over a thousand feet below the surface, is currently the only operating underground mine in the province. The massive mining vehicles that operate in the mine are lowered into it piece-by-piece on an elevator and then put together inside the mine. They never drive on the surface and only leave the mine, again in pieces, when their working life is over.

The Nova Scotia Liberals issued a statement on October 17 calling for the government to extend the rebate to the mining and quarrying industry and the Progressive Conservative caucus tabled a bill in the legislature on October 25 which would enact the change.

Including mining in the off-highway fuel tax rebate would cost the government approximately $2.6 million per year. It would apply to a range of vehicles that operate on mine sites, such as haul trucks and excavators, most of which never leave the mines and are not allowed to drive on public roads.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

November 5, 2012
MANS CALLS ON GOVERNMENT TO SUPPORT BILL 99
PC bill would give mining the fuel tax rebate

Nova Scotia’s mining industry is calling on the government to pass a private members bill that would give mining and quarrying the same fuel tax rebate that other resource industries get.

Progressive Conservative MLA and Natural Resources Critic Alfie MacLeod tabled Bill 99, amendments to the Revenue Act, in the legislature on October 25. The Bill’s explanatory note says it “exempts the mining industry from the gasoline and diesel oil tax in the same way as the fishing, farming and forestry industries are exempted.”

“Bill 99 would help the mining industry grow and create jobs in rural areas,” said Pat Mills, President of MANS. “We are asking the government to support and pass the Bill during the fall session of the legislature. Helping the rural economy is too important to put off.”

“The government should help all resource industries invest in the province and create jobs,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “Forestry, fishing and farming get the fuel tax rebate and mining should get it too.”

The Nova Scotia Liberal Caucus issued a statement on October 17 in support of giving the rebate to mining.

The provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other natural resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and off-highway forestry vehicles. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry, but is the only province that does not give it to mining.

Including mining in the off-highway fuel tax rebate would cost the government approximately $2.6 million per year. It would apply to a range of vehicles that operate on mine sites, such as haul trucks and excavators, most of which never leave the mines and are not allowed to drive on public roads.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

October 29, 2012
GOVERNMENT GETS ROCK CANDY REMINDER OF MINING TAX ISSUE
Mining industry’s contribution to economy “pretty sweet”

The provincial government is getting a Halloween reminder of the mining and quarrying industry’s call for fair tax treatment.

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is delivering loot bags filled with rock candy to MLAs today, along with a note that says the industry should be treated the same as other natural resource industries under the government’s fuel tax rebate system.

“This rock candy is a Halloween reminder that our rocks and minerals help employ over 6300 Nova Scotians and contribute $500 million to the economy. Pretty sweet, eh?” said Pat Mills, President of MANS.

“The government should treat all natural resource industries the same,” said MANS Executive Director Sean Kirby. “Forestry, fishing and farming get the off-highway fuel tax rebate. The mining industry should get it too. It’s a matter of fairness.”

MANS recently launched a “Fuel Tax Fairness” campaign to get the off-highway fuel tax rebate that the government gives other resource industries.

The provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other natural resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and off-highway forestry vehicles. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry, but is the only province that does not give it to mining.

The fuel tax harms the province’s mining industry in two main ways: 1) It makes mining in Nova Scotia more expensive compared to other provinces and hurts Nova Scotia’s mineral exports; and 2) it discourages mining companies from investing in Nova Scotia.

Including mining in the off-highway fuel tax rebate would cost the government approximately $2.6 million per year. It would apply to a range of vehicles that operate on mine sites, such as hauler trucks and excavators, most of which never leave the mines and are not allowed to drive on public roads.

October 25, 2012
OPPOSITION PARTIES SUPPORT FUEL TAX FAIRNESS
“Rebate would allow us to create more jobs in rural areas”

Nova Scotia’s opposition parties have both come out in favour of giving mining the fuel tax rebate that other resource industries get.

The Nova Scotia Liberals issued a statement on October 17 calling for the government to extend the rebate to the mining and quarrying industry and today the Progressive Conservative caucus tabled a bill in the legislature which would enact the change.

“We appreciate the opposition parties supporting our call for mining to be treated fairly compared to other resource industries,” said Pat Mills, President of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “We hope the government will also agree that mining should be treated the same as forestry, fishing and farming and get the off-highway fuel tax rebate. It’s a matter of fairness.”

“Giving the mining industry the rebate would allow us to create more jobs in rural areas,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “The government should treat all resource industries the same. The government should help all resource industries grow, create jobs and invest in Nova Scotia.”

The provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other natural resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and off-highway forestry vehicles. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry, but is the only province that does not give it to mining.

The fuel tax harms the province’s mining industry in two main ways: 1) It makes mining in Nova Scotia more expensive compared to other provinces and hurts Nova Scotia’s mineral exports; and 2) it discourages mining companies from investing in Nova Scotia.

Including mining in the off-highway fuel tax rebate would cost the government approximately $2.6 million per year. It would apply to a range of vehicles that operate on mine sites, such as haul trucks and excavators, most of which never leave the mines and are not allowed to drive on public roads.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

October 23, 2012
MINING INDUSTRY: “FUEL TAX IS A JOBS KILLER"
NS only province in Canada that charges miners fuel tax

The provincial government is hurting Nova Scotia’s mining industry by not giving it the fuel tax rebate that every other province provides.

“The fuel tax is a jobs killer,” said Pat Mills, President of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “It puts Nova Scotia miners at a competitive disadvantage compared to other provinces, such as New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Quebec. It discourages investment in Nova Scotia and prevents the industry from creating new jobs.”

“Mining is one of Nova Scotia’s leading export industries, but we are losing business to other provinces where it is cheaper to operate,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “Every other province gives resource industries a rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as mining trucks, fishing boats and farm tractors. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry but does not give it to mining.”

MANS recently launched a “Fuel Tax Fairness” campaign to get the off-highway fuel tax rebate that the government gives other resource industries.

Including mining in the fuel tax rebate would cost the government approximately $2.6 million per year. It would apply to a range of vehicles that operate on mine sites, such as haul trucks and excavators, most of which never leave the mines and are not allowed to drive on public roads. The provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

October 15, 2012
MINING INDUSTRY CALLS FOR FUEL TAX FAIRNESS
“The government should treat all natural resource industries the same”

Nova Scotia’s mining industry today launched a “Fuel Tax Fairness” campaign to get the fuel tax rebate that the provincial government gives other resource industries.

“The government should treat all natural resource industries the same,” said Pat Mills, President of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “Forestry, fishing and farming get the off-highway fuel tax rebate. The mining industry should get it too. It’s a matter of fairness.”

“These mining vehicles do not drive on public roads and highways so they should not have to pay tax on the fuel they use,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “The government effectively admits this by giving the rebate to forestry, fishing and farming, so it should also give the rebate to mining.”

The provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other natural resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and off-highway forestry vehicles. Nova Scotia gives the rebate to fishing, farming and forestry, but is the only province that does not give it to mining.

The fuel tax harms the province’s mining industry in two main ways: 1) It makes mining in Nova Scotia more expensive compared to other provinces and hurts Nova Scotia’s mineral exports; and 2) it discourages mining companies from investing in Nova Scotia.

Including mining in the off-highway fuel tax rebate would cost the government approximately $2.6 million per year. It would apply to a range of vehicles that operate on mine sites, such as haul trucks and excavators, most of which never leave the mines and are not allowed to drive on public roads.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.

October 4, 2012
RURAL NS THANKFUL FOR MINING JOBS
“Mining industry lets me live where I want and be with my family”


As rural areas struggle through tough times, thousands of Nova Scotians are thankful this holiday weekend that the mining and quarrying industry continues to be a pillar of the rural economy.

Iain Smart is one of those Nova Scotians. “In the past two years I’ve worked in Alberta and Saskatchewan,” said Smart, now a Senior Mine Engineer with ScoZinc, a zinc-lead mine in Cooks Brook, NS. “I was on 2-week rotations and would fly back and forth to be with my family. I am thankful to have a job in Nova Scotia’s mining industry that lets me live where I want and be with my family.”

Smart, who has 2 young kids, is one of 6,300 Nova Scotians employed by the mining industry, mostly in rural areas. His company, ScoZinc, owned by Selwyn Resources hopes to operational in the coming year. By that time, ScoZinc will employ roughly 140 people.

“The Mining industry's total payroll is $96 million per year and most of it goes into rural parts of the province,” Sean Kirby, MANS’ Executive Director. “The industry’s high wages reflect the fact that mining today is a sophisticated, high tech industry that employs a wide variety of professional and technically-advanced positions. Modern mining is about knowledge, not strength.”

For Smart, it’s about being home with his young family: “It’s good to be home every night for bedtime.”

Mining and quarrying is Nova Scotia’s highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province. The industry’s average wage is over $1,000 per week, 40% higher than the average wages paid in all economic sectors.

The industry is also one of Nova Scotia’s leading export industries. It exports about one third of its production to the United States each year, or about $105 million worth of minerals. Nova Scotia’s easy access to shipping by sea, and close proximity to the United States, makes the province an important supplier to the US construction industry.

Nova Scotia Mining Week runs from October 1-5.

October 1, 2012
MINING FOR JOBS AND PROSPERITY
Nova Scotia Mining Week starts October 1


Today marks the beginning of Nova Scotia Mining Week, an opportunity to highlight the mining industry’s contribution to the province’s economy.

“The mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians,” said Pat Mills, President of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The industry provides 6,300 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $500 million to the province’s
economy each year. Mining is the highest-paying natural resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province.”

"It is my pleasure to congratulate the Mining Association of Nova Scotia for re-establishing Mining Week," said Natural Resources Minister Charlie Parker. "The mining industry has a long and vibrant history in Nova Scotia, and it remains a significant contributor to our province, generating hundreds of millions of dollars for our economy and providing highly paid and specialized employment for thousands of workers, particularly in rural Nova Scotia.”

“Mining today is a sophisticated, high tech industry that is vital to our economy and way of life,” said Sean Kirby, MANS’ Executive Director. “Mining contributes to virtually everything in our daily lives that isn’t farmed, from houses to roads to playgrounds. The materials we take from the ground are the foundation of our modern society.”

Mining began in Nova Scotia in Sydney, where coal was reportedly first mined in 1672. The first commercial coal mining venture in Canada was established by the French in 1720 in Cow Bay, Cape Breton, to supply Louisbourg. Nova Scotia’s first international trade in minerals took place in 1724 when a shipment of coal was sent to Boston.

Today, Nova Scotians explore and mine for a range of minerals, including aggregate, gypsum, limestone, salt, coal, gold, sand and anhydrite. Much of the material is used in the province for construction, such as building homes, hospitals, schools, recreation facilities and roads. Others are exported around the world, making mining one of Nova Scotia’s biggest export industries.

Nova Scotia Mining Week runs from October 1-5.

More information:
Sean Kirby, Executive Director
Mining Association of Nova Scotia
Tel: 902-820-2115
Email: sean@tmans.ca
www.tmans.ca