December 16, 2016
MANS ANNOUNCES JUDGES FOR STUDENT VIDEO CONTEST
The Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) announced today the judging panel for its “Mining ROCKS! Video Contest.”
“We are delighted to have such an impressive and diverse group of people serving as judges in this year’s contest,” said Sean Kirby, MANS’ Executive Director. “We really hope students will take advantage of this opportunity to learn about mining and put their creative efforts before this accomplished panel.”

“I am very pleased to be a judge for the video contest and to work in partnership with the mining association on educating students about the industry,” said Membertou Chief Terry Paul, one of the contest judges. “We all want to create more opportunities and a brighter future for our children, and the video contest is a good way to teach them about mining.”

The eleven judges are:

1. Hon. Lloyd Hines, Minister of Natural Resources
2. Membertou Chief Terry Paul
3. Timothy Habinski, Warden, the Municipality of the County of Annapolis
4. Bruce Morrison, Warden, Municipality of Victoria County
5. Martha Cooley, Executive Director, Atlantic Filmmakers Cooperative
6. John Demont, Senior Writer, The Chronicle Herald; Author of Coal Black Heart
7. Sheldon MacLeod, Host, News 95.7
8. Patrick McCarron, IT/AV Media Services Specialist, Nova Scotia Community College
9. Iain MacLeod, ad writer and marketing consultant
10. Gavin Isenor, Past President, Mining Association of Nova Scotia
11. Peter Moreira, Founder of Entrevestor
12. Amanda Pride, Manager, Community Programming Halifax, Eastlink TV

The contest, which is open to all junior high and high school students in Nova Scotia, encourages kids to produce short videos about mining and quarrying.

The winners in five different categories will be awarded $1000, with $500 going to the runner-ups.

January 13 is the “early bird” deadline in the contest. Students who have submitted their entries by that date will be entered into a draw for two $250 prizes. The final deadline for entries is February 28.

For more information, go to www.NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca/contest

October 18, 2016
MANS LAUNCHES THIRD YEAR OF THE “MINING ROCKS! VIDEO CONTEST”
Over $8000 in Cash Prizes
Now that students have settled into the new school year, the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) is hoping to inspire junior high and high schools to get creative – and win big.

Today, MANS announced that the “Mining ROCKS! Video Contest” is back for a third year. The contest, which is open to all junior high and high school students in Nova Scotia, encourages kids to produce short videos about mining and quarrying. The winners in five different categories will be awarded $1000, with $500 going to the runner-up.

“The videos can be about virtually any aspect of mining and quarrying, including its economic importance, environment and reclamation, historical facts and beneficial end-uses of mining products,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director. “And we encourage students to have fun with it – to be creative and make their video stand out from the crowd.”

“The video contest is a great way to educate students about mining and how important it is to our province,” said Natural Resources Minister Lloyd Hines, a judge for the contest. "I am very pleased to be working with MANS on this educational initiative.”

Students will upload their video to the MANS website and a panel of judges, who are mainly independent of the industry, will pick the winners for the Best Junior High School Video, Best High School Video, Best Comedy and Best 30-Second Commercial. The fifth category, the People’s Choice winner, will be decided by the public through an online vote.

Last year’s judging panel included Minister Hines, Membertou Chief Terry Paul, as well as several accomplished film and media professionals.

The deadline for video entries is February 28, 2017. In addition, students who get their videos in by January 13, 2017 will be entered into a draw to win two $250 “early bird” prizes.

For more information, go to http://NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca/contest

May 18, 2016
MINING INDUSTRY CONCERNED REBATE PROMISE MAY NOT BE KEPT
Survey: 70% do not believe fuel tax rebate promise will be fulfilled in 2017 budget

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry is increasingly concerned that the provincial government won’t ever keep a promise it made to the industry.

“The provincial government promised to start giving the fuel tax rebate to our industry in its 2015 budget but did not keep that promise,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The 2016 budget also did not give our industry the rebate even though the budget had a surplus and it gave millions of dollars in support to some other industries. A recent industry survey suggests our members are concerned the promise may never be kept.”

The MANS survey asked industry leaders “Do you believe the provincial government will fulfill its promise to give the fuel tax rebate to the mining and quarrying industry in the 2017 budget?” 70% said no, 8% said yes, and 21% said they did not know.

A November 10, 2014 news release issued by then-Natural Resources Minister Churchill promised that the industry would start receiving the rebate in 2015: “Mr. Churchill said the government will start phasing in a fuel-tax rebate program for mining and quarrying vehicles, and introduce a revised Mineral Resources Act, in 2015.”

A May 2014 letter to MANS from then-Finance Minister Whalen stated: "We intend to fulfill our election commitment over the final three years of our mandate ... the removal of the fuel tax will allow the sector to be more competitive and to reinvest in its strengths."

Following the 2016 budget, a government spokesperson was quoted in the media saying "We will continue our conversations with industry and when the province is in a sustainable fiscal position this is something that can and will be considered."

“Saying the rebate will be ‘considered’ raises further questions about whether the government will follow through on its commitment,” said Kirby. “The government recently did an excellent job updating the Mineral Resources Act but the uncertainty around the fuel tax rebate is very harmful to the industry.”

Provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and forestry harvesters. Nova Scotia does not give the rebate to mining and quarrying.

The industry survey was conducted April 25-May 2. The 51 respondents included the full range of industry players: producers, prospectors/explorers and service/supply companies.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 people and generates $420 million per year in economic activity.

May 9, 2016
MANS MARKS WESTRAY ANNIVERSARY
Mining injury rates reduced 90%
The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is marking the anniversary of the Westray mine disaster by highlighting how the industry has changed in recent decades.

"As an industry, we believe the most important thing to come out of a mine is the miner, and our safety record reflects this," said MANS' Executive Director Sean Kirby. "Injury rates in Nova Scotia's mining and quarrying industry have been reduced 90% in the past two decades, and are lower than other comparable industries. We are committed to continuous improvement in mine and quarry safety - to making sure a tragedy like Westray never happens again."

The Westray mine in Plymouth, Nova Scotia, exploded at 5:20 a.m. on May 9, 1992, taking the lives of 26 miners. A public inquiry into the disaster, conducted by Justice K. Peter Richard, led to significant changes in the way the industry is regulated and was a milestone in the establishment of a safety culture that has become a hallmark of the industry today.

Justice Richard's 1997 report also commented that "The industry is very close-knit with an interdependence, camaraderie, and fellowship that may be unique in modern-day business. And people in the industry, at all levels, regard what occurred at Westray as a personal matter affecting them as if it had happened in their own backyard. It is for them a family tragedy."

Nova Scotia's mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 5,500 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $420 million dollars to the province's economy each year. The Ivany Commission said traditional industries like mining and quarrying "will provide the essential foundations for Nova Scotia's rural economy."

April 20, 2016
MANS DISAPPOINTED WITH BUDGET
Fuel tax rebate promise still not fulfilled
The Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) is disappointed the provincial government has still not followed through on a promise to give the fuel tax rebate to the mining and quarrying industry.

“The government promised it would start giving us the rebate in 2015 to support the industry and help us create jobs, particularly in rural areas," said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia. "We are disappointed the government still has not fulfilled this commitment."

A November 10, 2014 news release issued by then-Natural Resources Minister Churchill promised that the industry would start receiving the rebate in 2015: “Mr. Churchill said the government will start phasing in a fuel-tax rebate program for mining and quarrying vehicles, and introduce a revised Mineral Resources Act, in 2015.” However, the government’s 2015 and 2016 budgets did not make the policy change. The news release is available at http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20141110002.

Provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and forestry harvesters. Nova Scotia does not give the rebate to mining and quarrying.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 people and generates $420 million per year in economic activity. However, it also faces significant challenges:

· According to 2013 research commissioned by the government, Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry lost approximately 800 jobs in the previous five years, and its economic output shrank by $80 million per year.

· According to PricewaterhouseCoopers, Nova Scotia is the highest-cost jurisdiction in Canada in terms of tax and royalty payments to the provincial government.

· According to the Fraser Institute’s annual global survey of mining executives, Nova Scotia is seen as the least attractive province for mining companies to invest in.

January 5, 2016
MANS ANNOUNCES JUDGES FOR STUDENT VIDEO CONTEST

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) announced today the judging panel for its “Mining ROCKS! Video Contest.”

“We are delighted to have such an impressive and diverse group of people serving as judges in this year’s contest,” said Sean Kirby, MANS’ Executive Director. “We really hope students will take advantage of this opportunity to learn about mining and put their creative efforts before this accomplished panel.”

“I am very pleased to be a judge for the video contest and to work in partnership with the mining association on educating students about the industry,” said Membertou Chief Terry Paul, one of the contest judges. “We all want to create more opportunities and a brighter future for our children, and the video contest is a good way to teach them about mining.”

The eleven judges are:

· Hon. Lloyd Hines, Minister of Natural Resources

· Membertou Chief Terry Paul

· Don Downe, Mayor, Municipality of the District of Lunenburg

· Vernon Pitts, Warden, Municipality of the District of Guysborough

· Michael Amo, Screenwriter and creator of CTV’s “The Listener”

· Stephen Melanson, Instructor, Radio and Television Arts Department, NSCC

· Rhonda Ann MacDonald, Manager, Eastlink TV Community Programming, Halifax

· Martha Cooley, Executive Director, Atlantic Filmmakers Cooperative

· John Demont, Senior Writer, The Chronicle Herald; Author of Coal Black Heart

· Peter Moreira, Founder of Entrevestor

· Gavin Isenor, Past President, Mining Association of Nova Scotia

· Sheldon MacLeod, Host, News 95.7

The contest, which is open to all junior high and high school students in Nova Scotia, encourages kids to produce short videos about mining and quarrying. The winners in five different categories will be awarded $1000, with $500 going to the runner-ups.

January 15 is the “early bird” deadline in the contest. Students who have submitted their entries by that date will be entered into a draw for $500. The final deadline for entries is February 26.

For more information, go to www.NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca/contest