September 3, 2018
MINING AND QUARRYING LABOUR DAY FACTS

Today’s mining and quarrying industry is a sophisticated, high tech business that is vital to our way of life – and a very different industry than in the past.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians and generates $420 million per year in economic activity.

Mining and quarrying is Nova Scotia’s highest-paying resource industry and one of the highest-paying of all industries in the province. Its average wage is over $55,000 per year.

The industry's total payroll is approximately $96 million per year.

The industry is committed to hiring locally and ensuring that the economic benefits of the industry are primarily enjoyed by Nova Scotians. According to a 2017 survey of Mining Association of Nova Scotia members, 97% of jobs at mines and quarries are filled by Nova Scotians.

Existing operations are usually staffed 100%, or very close to it, by Nova Scotians. It is in new operations that we see slightly smaller, though still very impressive, percentages of local hires. Opening new operations safely and successfully sometimes requires bringing in some expertise from outside the province.

We believe the most important thing to come out of a mine is the miner, and our safety record reflects this. Injury rates in the province’s mining and quarrying industry have been reduced 90% in the last two decades, and are lower than other comparable industries.

Learn more about mining and minerals in Nova Scotia at www.NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca

September 2, 2018
MANS RELEASES EDUCATIONAL INFO ABOUT MINING AND MINERALS
Back to school update to educational web site

As students head back to school this week, the Mining Association of Nova Scotia is releasing new educational material about mining and minerals.

“We have just added a great deal of new material to our educational web site, www.NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The site explains, in layperson’s terms, that today’s industry is a sophisticated, high tech business that is vital to our way of life – and a very different industry than in the past. We encourage students, and all Nova Scotians, to visit the site to learn more about how the industry works and the importance of minerals in their daily lives.”

The site now features a series of videos that explain the environmental and operational issues Nova Scotians often have questions about:

How mining works (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/how-mining-works)
Blasting (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/blasting)
Water (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/water-management)
Dust (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/dust)
Noise (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/noise)
Reclamation (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/we-give-back)

Approximately 20,000 words about minerals in Nova Scotia have been added to the site (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/why-mining-matters).

An online reclamation quiz, Find the Mine, illustrates that after mines and quarries have been reclaimed, it can be very difficult to tell that an operation was ever there (https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/find-the-mine).

The Mining ROCKS! Video Contest is an excellent program for educating students about the industry, minerals and geoscience. You can check out this year’s winners and the almost one hundred entries the contest has received in the past four years at https://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/contest.

The province’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians and generates $420 million per year in economic activity.

July 30, 2018
DOCUMENTS PROVE PROTECTED AREAS DISPROPORTIONATELY HARM MINING
“We all support protecting land but we need to avoid unnecessarily harming our economy”
Government documents prove that the province’s protected areas plan disproportionately harms the mining industry, according to the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS).

“When the previous government released the protected areas plan, it said it had taken economic potential, including mineral potential, into account when choosing which lands to protect,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “Documents on the government’s web site suggest otherwise. Seventy-six percent of the protected areas discussed in detail on the government’s site have medium or high mineral potential, according to the government’s own analysis. We all support protecting land but we need to avoid unnecessarily harming our economy.”

The Parks and Protected Areas plan identified 782 areas for protection. MANS was able to find pages on Nova Scotia Environment’s web site for 179 of those areas which included NSE’s assessment of whether the areas have low, medium or high mineral potential. Of the 179 areas:

  • 137 areas (76 percent) are considered by NSE to have medium and/or high mineral potential;
  • Fifty-eight areas (32 percent) are considered by NSE to have high mineral potential; and
  • 35 areas (20 percent) had mineral claims staked in them when the previous government chose to include them in the protected areas plan.

“These documents suggest the economy was not a significant factor for the previous government as it rushed to choose protected areas,” said Kirby. “If these areas are representative of the plan in general, the plan will harm the province’s economy forever by protecting hundreds of sites that could otherwise potentially be used to create jobs for Nova Scotians.”

The Parks and Protected Areas plan states on page 16 that “Some existing mineral and petroleum rights are overlapped by new provincial parks, wilderness areas, and nature reserves identified in this plan. Throughout the planning process, protected area boundaries were designed to minimize the overlap with such rights where possible.”

The previous provincial government released the protected areas plan on August 1, 2013 and called an election five weeks later on September 7. MANS believes the rush to finish the plan before the 2013 election contributed to flaws in the land selection process.

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a “land swap” mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province.

The NSE web site pages MANS reviewed can be found at https://novascotia.ca/parksandprotectedareas/plan/lands-profiles/.

The province’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

July 13, 2018
MANS PURSUES MINERALS PLAY FAIRWAY
Government making strategic investments to create new jobs

Government of Nova Scotia funding announced this week is the first step toward creating a minerals version of the province’s oil and gas Play Fairway Analysis, says the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS).

The government’s new Mineral Resources Development Fund is providing $62,000 to conduct a needs assessment of the province’s publicly-held airborne geophysical data. The needs assessment will identify strengths and weaknesses in Nova Scotia’s minerals database and make recommendations for how to improve it in order to attract more investment and job creation to the province.

“The Government of Nova Scotia is making strategic investments to help the mining industry grow and create new jobs for Nova Scotians,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “The needs assessment project is the first step toward building a minerals version of Play Fairway – a free, best-in-class database of geological knowledge that will help attract mining companies to Nova Scotia. The oil and gas Play Fairway was a made-in -Nova-Scotia success story and we want to copy it for the minerals industry.”

In 2008, the Government of Nova Scotia commissioned a $15 million Play Fairway Analysis and Geoscience Data Package Program with the goal of stimulating offshore petroleum exploration activity. The resulting data was made available for free to the global oil and gas industry and attracted over $2 billion in investment in Nova Scotia’s offshore.

The Mineral Resources Development Fund was introduced in the Government of Nova Scotia’s Budget 2018-19. The fund supports grassroots prospecting through to more advanced mineral exploration. It also provides marketing grants that enable prospectors to promote their mineral prospects and assists in securing research grants that build partnerships between university researchers, prospectors and mineral exploration companies. The government’s July 11 news release announcing the grants is available at: https://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20180711003

In addition to establishing the Mineral Resources Development Fund this spring, the Government of Nova Scotia has also recently extended the province’s fuel tax rebate to the mining and quarrying industry and done an excellent overhaul of its Mineral Resources Act. Last week it gave the mining industry a higher profile within government by removing mining from the Department of Natural Resources and creating a new Department of Energy and Mines.

July 6, 2018
MANS RESPONDS TO MAEST REPORT
"Mining and quarrying is an environmentally-responsible industry that is stringently regulated"

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is responding to a new report written by controversial American activist Ann Maest.

“Mining and quarrying is an environmentally-responsible industry that is stringently regulated by the provincial government,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The province’s regulatory regime helps ensure that Nova Scotians enjoy the full benefits of the materials we take from the ground, and that the industry operates in a safe, sustainable, responsible fashion. The concerns raised in the Maest report are simply unfounded.”

Anti-mining group Sustainable Northern Nova Scotia (SuNNS), which released the Maest report today, describes Maest as a “leading expert.” However, Ms. Maest is perhaps best-known for recanting her testimony in a $19 billion legal battle in which she first testified against Chevron and later disavowed her testimony against the company.

A 2013 New York Times article entitled “Consultant Recants in Chevron Pollution Case in Ecuador” describes how Ms. Maest and her consulting firm Stratus Consulting recanted “research favorable to the villagers’ claims of pollution in remote tracts of jungle.” According to the story, Stratus “had decided to disavow its contributions to scientific research about whether there was groundwater contamination that sickened the residents in swaths of rain forest.” The NYT report is available at https://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/13/business/research-recanted-in-oil-pol....

According to a 2013 Reuters report, Stratus Managing Scientist Ann Maest and Executive Vice President Douglas Beltman wrote in affidavits, “I disavow any and all findings and conclusions in all of my reports and testimony on the Ecuador Project.” The story is available at https://www.reuters.com/article/us-chevron-ecuador-idUSBRE93B15220130412.

A 2015 column written in the Denver Post, in Ms. Maest’s home state of Colorado, stated: “If participating in an international conspiracy to defraud an oil company isn’t enough to ruin your reputation, what would do it? The question arises because work by Stratus Consulting of Boulder — exposed for shameful conduct in Ecuador — is once again at the center of a dispute over a pollution settlement….” The Denver Post column is at https://www.denverpost.com/2015/07/24/carroll-boulders-stratus-consultin...

The following short video, produced by Chevron, explains Ms. Maest’s role in the Chevron/Ecuador case: http://theamazonpost.com/science-fiction-plaintiffs-own-experts-admit-ca...

Water is used on mine and quarry sites for various purposes, such as controlling dust and as part of processing. Mines and quarries test water discharges on at least a monthly basis, and treat it to ensure water quality is within acceptable levels. Water released back into a river or lake is often cleaner after it has been used in a mine or quarry than it was beforehand. Companies are required to submit regular reports to the government to ensure they are compliant with all rules and regulations.

Watersheds are areas where rains falls and gets directed to one or more outflows. All manner of human activities take place in watersheds, including ski hills, residential and commercial development and resource industries. Stringent government regulation and responsible environmental practices are in place to ensure mining does not harm watersheds and drinking water sources. Many activities that can potentially cause harm to watersheds are not regulated to the extent that the mining industry is.

Gold in Nova Scotia is generally not found in nuggets; it is found in tiny flecks, often microscopically small. Because those flecks are usually within rock, it has to be separated from the rock using various processes. Cyanide leaching has been the main gold extraction technology since the 1970s because it is more effective, safer and has less environmental impact than other options, such as mercury. Cyanide leaching is usually done along with a physical process like milling, crushing, floatation and gravity separation.

Mining operations use the smallest amount of cyanide necessary to extract gold effectively. This reduces cost and environmental concerns. Mining operations also recycle cyanide and remove it from tailings before tailings are released to a tailings management facility. Any residual cyanide in tailings naturally photodegrades with exposure to air and sunlight.

Cyanide is a naturally occurring chemical that is found throughout nature. At least 1000 species of plants, micro-organisms and insects are capable of producing cyanide. Foods such as coffee, almonds, lima beans and table salt all contain small amounts of naturally-occurring cyanide.

Cyanide does not persist in the environment and is quickly and naturally broken down when exposed to sunlight and air. The human body has a natural ability to detoxify small quantities of cyanide, so it generally poses little risk.

More information about how Nova Scotia’s mining industry takes care of water is available at http://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/water-management

March 29, 2018
AND THE WINNER IS…
Winners announced in student video contest

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is pleased to announce the winners of its "Mining ROCKS! Video Contest."

“Students from across the province created incredibly clever and interesting videos about mining and quarrying,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “We congratulate all the students for their excellent work and thank them for participating in the contest.”

The videos can be viewed at: http://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/contest

The winners and runners-up of the contest are:

Best High School Video

Winner: Jacob Routledge ($1000) from Glace Bay High School for “Mining Animation”
Runner-up (2-WAY TIE):
Edmund Wohlmuth ($250) from Horton High School for “Past, Present and Future”
Christene Southwell ($250) from Glace Bay High School for “There’s More to Mining”

Junior High Video

Winner: Rhianna Waligura-Newman ($1000) from Gorsebrook Junior High School for “The Mining ABC’s”
Runner-up (3-WAY TIE):
Nicole Dion ($166) from Madeline Symonds Middle School for “Discover Mining”
Raegyn Judge ($166) from Hebbville Academy for “Job Fair Interview”
Heather MacDonald ($166) from Astral Drive Junior High for “Traveling Back”

Best Comedy

Winner: Nicole Dion ($1000) from Madeline Symonds Middle School for “The Mining Game”
Runner-up: Joshua Grant ($500) from Sir John A. MacDonald High School for “It’s Mine”

Best 30-Second Commercial

Winner: Hannah Lawrence ($1000) from Citadel High School for “Women in Mining”
Runner-up (3-WAY TIE):
Fumairia Laureijs ($166), Homeschool, for “Are YOU Mindful?”
Christelinda Laureijs ($166), Homeschool, for “Hurray for Mining!”
Nicole Dion ($166) from Madeline Symonds Middle School for “Mining: Greener than you think”

People’s Choice

Winner: Jacob Routledge ($1000) from Glace Bay High School for “Mining Animation”
Runner-up: Nathan Woodworth ($500) from Hants East Rural High for “Mining in Nova Scotia”

This year’s judging panel included Margaret Miller, Minister of Natural Resources, Membertou Chief Terry Paul, Christine Blair, Mayor of the Municipality of the County of Colchester, Bill Mills, Mayor of Truro, and several accomplished film and media professionals.

The contest awarded $8000 in prizes and in its fourth year.

Nova Scotia's mining and quarrying industry is a key creator of jobs and prosperity for Nova Scotians. It provides 5,500 jobs, mostly in rural areas, and contributes $420 million dollars to the province's economy each year.

March 29, 2018
MANS RESPONDS TO WATER MANAGEMENT QUESTIONS
"Mining and quarrying is an environmentally-responsible industry that is stringently regulated"
The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is responding to questions about how the industry takes care of water.

“Mining and quarrying is an environmentally-responsible industry that is stringently regulated by the provincial government,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “The province’s regulatory regime helps ensure that Nova Scotians enjoy the full benefits of the materials we take from the ground, and that the industry operates in a safe, sustainable, responsible fashion.”

“Two major new gold mines were opened in Nova Scotia in 2017, and a number of companies are currently doing gold exploration in the province,” said Kirby. “These projects have created hundreds of new jobs for Nova Scotians with more opportunities anticipated in coming years.”

Water is used on mine and quarry sites for various purposes, such as controlling dust and as part of processing. Mines and quarries test water discharges on at least a monthly basis, and treat it to ensure water quality is within acceptable levels. Water released back into a river or lake is often cleaner after it has been used in a mine or quarry than it was beforehand. Companies are required to submit regular reports to the government to ensure they are compliant with all rules and regulations.

Gold in Nova Scotia is generally not found in nuggets; it is found in tiny flecks, often microscopically small. Because those flecks are usually within rock, it has to be separated from the rock using various processes. Cyanide leaching has been the main gold extraction technology since the 1970s because it is more effective, safer and has less environmental impact than other options, such as mercury. Cyanide leaching is usually done along with a physical process like milling, crushing, floatation and gravity separation.

Mining operations use the smallest amount of cyanide necessary to extract gold effectively. This reduces cost and environmental concerns. Mining operations also recycle cyanide and remove it from tailings before tailings are released to a tailings management facility. Any residual cyanide in tailings naturally photodegrades with exposure to air and sunlight.

Cyanide is a naturally occurring chemical that is found throughout nature. At least 1000 species of plants, micro-organisms and insects are capable of producing cyanide. Foods such as coffee, almonds, lima beans and table salt all contain small amounts of naturally-occurring cyanide.

Cyanide does not persist in the environment and is quickly and naturally broken down when exposed to sunlight and air. The human body has a natural ability to detoxify small quantities of cyanide, so it generally poses little risk.

More information about how Nova Scotia’s mining industry takes care of water is available at http://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/water-management

March 21, 2018
MINING ASSOCIATION APPLAUDS BUDGET
"MRDF is a smart, strategic investment in the future of our industry"

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) is pleased the new provincial government budget provides funding to establish the Mineral Resources Development Fund (MRDF).

"The Mineral Resources Development Fund is a smart, strategic investment in the future of our industry," said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. "The provincial government has made a series of important policy decisions in recent years that are helping our industry grow and create jobs for Nova Scotians. The government's support helped us open three major new mines in 2017, representing hundreds of new jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars in new investment in the province."

The budget includes $700,000 for the MRDF in 2018-19. The MRDF is expected to have seven funding streams this fiscal year:

* Prospecting and Exploration Grants: Maximum $20K

* Shared Funding Exploration Grants: >$20K up to $200K (50/50)

* Marketing Grants

* Research Grants: Maximum $90K

* Education, Outreach, and Engagement Grants: Maximum $30K

* Innovation Grants: Maximum $200K

* Major Project Grants: Maximum $500K or higher if required

More information is available at https://novascotia.ca/NATR/meb/mrdp.asp.

"The Nova Scotia Liberal Party promised in its 2017 election platform to fund the MRDF at $1.5 million per year," said Kirby. "The funding in this year's budget is an excellent start but we look forward to the program's budget increasing to $1.5 million next year."

MANS has applauded other recent government decisions affecting the mining and quarrying industry, including the fall 2017 budget extending the fuel tax rebate to the industry and the 2016 overhaul of the Mineral Resources Act. These policy changes are reducing red tape and unnecessary costs, while continuing to hold the industry to the highest environmental and operational standards.

Nova Scotia's mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 people and generates $420 million per year in economic activity.

January 31, 2018
MANS ANNOUNCES JUDGES FOR STUDENT VIDEO CONTEST
The Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) announced today the judging panel for its “Mining ROCKS! Video Contest.”

“We are delighted to have such an impressive and diverse group of people serving as judges in this year’s contest,” said Sean Kirby, MANS’ Executive Director. “We really hope students will take advantage of this opportunity to learn about mining and put their creative efforts before this accomplished panel.”

“I am very pleased to be a judge for the video contest and to work in partnership with the mining association on educating students about the industry,” said Membertou Chief Terry Paul, one of the contest judges. “We all want to create more opportunities and a brighter future for our children, and the video contest is a good way to teach them about mining.”

The twelve judges are:

  • Hon. Margaret Miller, Minister of Natural Resources
  • Membertou Chief Terry Paul
  • Christine Blair, Mayor, Municipality of the County of Colchester
  • Bill Mills, Mayor of Truro
  • Rhonda Ann MacDonald, Manager, Eastlink TV Community Programming, Halifax
  • Martha Cooley, Executive Director, Atlantic Filmmakers Cooperative
  • John Demont, Senior Writer, The Chronicle Herald; Author of Coal Black Heart
  • Sheldon MacLeod, Host, News 95.7
  • Cecilia Jamasmie, Editor, mining.com
  • Patrick McCarron, IT/AV Media Services Specialist, Nova Scotia Community College
  • Iain MacLeod, ad writer and marketing consultant
  • Ian Palmeter, Past President, Mining Association of Nova Scotia

The contest, which is open to all junior high and high school students in Nova Scotia, encourages kids to produce short videos about mining and quarrying.

Students will upload their videos to the MANS website and the panel of judges, who are mainly independent of the industry, will pick the winners for the Best Junior High School Video, Best High School Video, Best Comedy and Best 30-Second Commercial. The fifth category, the People’s Choice winner, will be decided by the public through an online vote.

The deadline for video entries is February 23, 2018. In addition, students who get their videos in by January 5, 2018 will be entered into a draw to win two $250 “early bird” prizes.

The winner in each category will be awarded $1000, with $500 going to the runner-up. There is a total of $8000 in prize money this year.

For more information, go to www.NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca/contest

January 12, 2018
PROTECTED AREAS PLAN PROPOSES PROTECTING ARTILLERY RANGE
Site likely contains unexploded ordnance
The provincial government’s protected areas plan identified an unusual site for protection – a World War II weapons range that likely contains unexploded bombs.

“When most Nova Scotians think of protected areas, they picture beautiful, pristine, natural lands,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The truth is the protected areas plan includes many sites that do not live up to that expectation. In the previous government’s rush to release the plan, it included sites like clear cuts, logging roads, former mines, quarries and pits, and pipelines. It even included a former weapons range that is believed to contain unexploded ordnance.”

Camp Debert was a major military training facility that housed over 300,000 troops during WWII and included multiple ranges and training areas. Canadian troops would typically get one month of intensive training at Camp Debert before being deployed overseas.

The Staples Brook Range was a satellite facility of the camp that was used for weapons training. Grenades, mortars, anti-tank artillery and anti-aircraft munitions were used at the Range. The site is considered a medium risk for unexploded explosive ordnance (UXO), according to reports from the Department of National Defence’s “Director Ammunition and Explosives Regulation.”

In the provincial government’s Parks and Protected Areas Plan, the Staples Brook Range is included in a pending protected area called the Staples Brook Nature Reserve.

The previous provincial government chose protected areas under a tight timeline because it wanted to protect 13 percent of the province’s land mass before calling the 2013 provincial election. The protected areas plan was released on August 1, 2013 and the election was called on September 7.

According to 2013 media reports, approximately 2500 UXO were found and cleared from various Camp Debert lands in 2012. The Department of National Defence’s web site contains the following warning about the former Camp Debert lands: “Be advised that there is a chance of encountering unexploded explosive ordnance (UXO) while in these areas. UXO is the term for military explosives that were used but failed to function properly.”

DND posted danger signs in 2012 warning people against entering the Staples Brook Range due to the potential for UXO.

Another area of the Staples Brook Nature Reserve overlaps a coal deposit that has been mined in the past and could potentially become a future mine if it is not blocked by the land being protected.

MANS recently released a report which details how the protected areas plan harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report is entitled “A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians.”

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a “land swap” mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government’s portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

January 3, 2018
PREVIOUS GOVERNMENT CHOSE PROTECTED AREAS UNDER TIGHT DEADLINE
"Plan released just weeks before 2013 election"

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia has released a video that answers a question many Nova Scotians may be asking: why do the province’s protected areas include so many economic sites?

“The previous provincial government wanted to protect a huge amount of land, very quickly, with limited budget,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “That’s why protected areas include things like clear cuts, logging roads, former mines, quarries and pits, and pipelines.”

“The mining and quarrying industry supports protecting land but this is not what Nova Scotians expect of their protected areas,” said Kirby.

MANS’ video explains that the previous provincial government wanted to protect 13 percent of the province’s land mass before calling the 2013 provincial election. The government’s protected areas plan was eventually released on August 1, 2013 and the election was called on September 7.

The video, called “How were protected lands chosen?”, features images of protected areas that have traditionally been economic sites.

The video is at http://tmans.ca/protected-land-process.

MANS recently released a report which details how the protected areas plan harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report is entitled “A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians.”

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a “land swap” mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government’s portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

December 11, 2017
PHOTOS PROVE MANY PROTECTED AREAS NOT ECOLOGICALLY-UNIQUE
"The process for choosing protected lands was not perfect"

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia has released evidence that not all protected areas are as special as people might think.

"Some people believe all protected lands are ecologically-unique and important, but the truth is a lot of protected land is basically the same as unprotected land," said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). "The process for choosing protected lands was not perfect. Some protected areas are ecologically-unique. Others are just average, or have traditionally been economic lands."

"Beautiful, natural lands are important, but so is creating jobs," said Kirby. "Lands like these could easily be swapped out to create jobs and actually improve the ecological value of the protected lands portfolio."

MANS has released pictures and a video of protected areas that include clear cuts, logging roads, former mines, quarries and pits, and pipeline corridors. The images are from eight different protected areas in Colchester, Eastern Shore, Cumberland and Cape Breton. They are only examples of the many economic lands included in the protected areas plan, not a comprehensive list.

The photos and video are at http://tmans.ca/protected-land-process.

MANS recently released a report which details how the protected areas plan, established under the previous government, harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report, entitled "A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians," is available at http://tmans.ca/protected-lands.

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a "land swap" mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government's portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia's mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

December 13, 2017
EASTERNS SHORE'S ECONOMY HARMED BY PROTECTED AREAS
Land swap would help create jobs

Nova Scotia's Eastern shore is being disproportionately harmed by the provincial government's Parks and Protected Areas Plan, according to a new report.

"While the mining and quarrying industry supports protecting natural lands for future generations, we also believe the Plan needs to strike a better balance between protecting land and protecting jobs," said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). "The lands chosen for protection by the previous government disproportionately harm certain rural areas of the province, such as Eastern shore. We respectfully suggest that only a flawed process could result in those areas being forced to bear so much of the Plan's economic cost."

MANS recently released a report which details how the Plan harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report, entitled "A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians," is available at tmans.ca/protected-lands.

According to MANS' analysis, Guysborough County contains 8.7 per cent of the total amount of protected land in Nova Scotia, almost nine times as much as some other counties and the fourth largest percentage by county. Halifax County contains 10.6 per cent of the total amount of protected land in the province, most of it concentrated in the Eastern shore area.

Guysborough also contains eight known mineral occurrences that are overlapped by protected land. Halifax County contains 23, again, mostly concentrated in Eastern shore. These overlaps make it harder, or outright prevent, exploration and development of all that potential wealth.

One of the Halifax County overlaps is the Mooseland gold deposit, which was discovered in 1858 and was the first documented discovery of gold in Nova Scotia. This historical mine has established infrastructure and underground access in place, including roads and a 400-foot mineshaft. Current total inferred mineral resources for Mooseland are estimated at 454,000 ounces and a Nova Scotia company is working toward returning the site to production.

Despite being well-known as a former and potential future gold mine, approximately 5% of the Mooseland gold deposit is overlapped by the Tangier Grand Lake Wilderness Area, which makes it harder to attract investor interest and potentially reduces the value of the deposit.

One of the Guysborough overlaps is a significant deposit of potassium feldspar which was discovered in Guysborough in 2016. Potassium feldspar is an important ingredient in many products, including concrete, asphalt, glass, ceramics and abrasives. For example, potassium feldspar helps make floor tiles, sinks and bathrooms more durable.

Unfortunately, the Garry Potassium Feldspar Property is adjacent to, and runs into, a candidate protected area. This would make part of the deposit inaccessible, and reduce its potential value, if the land over it were formally protected. The pending protection also makes it harder to attract investment to the project because of uncertainty about whether it would be possible to get permits to operate a mine close to, but outside, a protected area.

While more exploration is necessary to define the deposit, it is believed it has the potential to create twenty to forty direct jobs for a quarter-century.

If MANS' proposed land swap mechanism was adopted, it could make it possible to swap out a small amount of protected land in order to improve the business case for the overall project.

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a "land swap" mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government's portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia's mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

December 11, 2017
PHOTOS PROVE MANY PROTECTED AREAS NOT ECOLOGICALLY-UNIQUE
“The process for choosing protected lands was not perfect”

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia has released evidence that not all protected areas are as special as people might think.

“Some people believe all protected lands are ecologically-unique and important, but the truth is a lot of protected land is basically the same as unprotected land,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The process for choosing protected lands was not perfect. Some protected areas are ecologically-unique. Others are just average, or have traditionally been economic lands.”

“Beautiful, natural lands are important, but so is creating jobs,” said Kirby. “Lands like these could easily be swapped out to create jobs and actually improve the ecological value of the protected lands portfolio.”

MANS has released pictures and a video of protected areas that include clear cuts, logging roads, former mines, quarries and pits, and pipeline corridors. The images are from eight different protected areas in Colchester, Eastern Shore, Cumberland and Cape Breton. They are only examples of the many economic lands included in the protected areas plan, not a comprehensive list.

The photos and video are at http://tmans.ca/protected-land-process.

MANS recently released a report which details how the protected areas plan, established under the previous government, harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report, entitled “A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians,” is available at tmans.ca/protected-lands.

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a “land swap” mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government’s portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

November 24, 2017
COLECHESTER’S ECONOMY HARMED BY PROTECTED AREAS
Land swap would help create jobs

Colchester County is being disproportionately harmed by the provincial government’s Parks and Protected Areas Plan, according to a new report. (see map attached)

“While the mining and quarrying industry supports protecting natural lands for future generations, we also believe the Plan needs to strike a better balance between protecting land and protecting jobs,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The lands chosen for protection by the previous government disproportionately harm certain rural areas of the province, such as Colchester. We respectfully suggest that only a flawed process could result in those areas being forced to bear so much of the Plan’s economic cost.”

MANS recently released a report which details how the Plan harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report, entitled “A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians,” is available at tmans.ca/protected-lands.

According to MANS’ analysis, Colchester County contains 5.3 per cent of the total amount of protected land in Nova Scotia, five times as much as some other counties.

Colchester also contains 43 known mineral occurrences that are overlapped by protected land. These overlaps make it harder, or outright prevent, exploration and development of all that potential wealth.

For example, the proposed St. Andrews River Wilderness Area overlaps four sand and gravel deposits that will be impossible to access when protection is finalized. Even the pending protection discourages investment in the deposits because of the risk that money invested could be lost.

Another pit, the South Branch pit, is not overlapped but is almost completely surrounded by the protected area which prevents the pit being expanded to access additional material. Material from quarries and pits is used mainly for construction within the province.

The proposed protected area also includes a gold deposit and a past-producing slate quarry.

The area has high potential for further aggregate development beyond these known deposits. Nova Scotia Environment acknowledges that the St. Andrews River Wilderness Area has “from low to high mineral potential.” However, all of these sites are harmed by the Parks and Protected Areas Plan.

If MANS’ proposed land swap mechanism was adopted, it could make it possible to swap out a small amount of protected land in order to make it possible to access these potential projects.

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a “land swap” mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government’s portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

November 14, 2017
CUMBERLAND'S ECONOMY HARMED BY PROTECTED AREAS
Land swap would help create jobs

Cumberland County is being disproportionately harmed by the provincial government’s Parks and Protected Areas Plan, according to a new report.

“While the mining and quarrying industry supports protecting natural lands for future generations, we also believe the Plan needs to strike a better balance between protecting land and protecting jobs,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The lands chosen for protection by the previous government disproportionately harm certain rural areas of the province, such as Cumberland. We respectfully suggest that only a flawed process could result in those areas being forced to bear so much of the Plan’s economic cost.”

MANS recently released a report which details how the Plan harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report, entitled “A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians,” is available at tmans.ca/protected-lands.

According to MANS’ analysis, Cumberland County contains 7.1% of the total amount of protected land in Nova Scotia, more than seven times as much as some other counties.

Cumberland County contains a total of 51 overlaps between protected areas and known mineral occurrences. These overlaps make it harder, or outright prevent, exploration and development of all that potential wealth. Some other counties contain far fewer, or even zero overlaps.

One of the overlaps is the Canfield Creek copper deposit, approximately five kilometres south of Pugwash. Unfortunately, the copper deposit is adjacent to, and runs into, a protected area. This makes the protected part of the deposit inaccessible and reduces the deposit’s potential value. It also makes it harder to attract investment to the project because of uncertainty about whether it would be possible to get permits to operate a mine close to, but outside, a protected area.

Several other nearby mineral deposits are also overlapped by protected land, including deposits of gypsum, iron and a historical copper mine (see map below).

If MANS’ proposed land swap mechanism was adopted, it could make it possible to swap out a small amount of protected land in order to improve the business case for the Canfield Creek deposit.

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a “land swap” mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government’s portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

November 14, 2017
CAPE BRETON’S ECONOMY HARMED BY PROTECTED AREAS
Land swap would help create jobs

Cape Breton is being disproportionately harmed by the provincial government’s Parks and Protected Areas Plan, according to a new report.

“While the mining and quarrying industry supports protecting natural lands for future generations, we also believe the Plan needs to strike a better balance between protecting land and protecting jobs,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “The lands chosen for protection by the previous government disproportionately harm certain areas of the province, such as Cape Breton. We respectfully suggest that only a flawed process could result in those areas being forced to bear so much of the Plan’s economic cost.”

MANS recently released a report which details how the Plan harms dozens of potential mineral projects and makes it harder for the industry to create new jobs for Nova Scotians. The report, entitled “A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians,” is available at tmans.ca/protected-lands.

According to MANS’ analysis, Cape Breton contains 30 percent of the total amount of protected land in Nova Scotia, even though it only contains 19 percent of the province’s land mass. That is a higher percentage of protected land than any other region of the province.

Cape Breton has 154 known mineral occurrences that are overlapped by protected land, also far more than any other region. These overlaps make it harder, or outright prevent, exploration and development of all that potential wealth on the island.

One of the overlaps is the Kelly’s Mountain aggregate deposit in Victoria County which is completely covered by the Kluscap Wilderness Area. The deposit’s geology essentially mirrors the successful Martin Marietta aggregate quarry at Port Hawkesbury along the Strait of Canso. The Martin Marietta quarry has been a mainstay of the strait area economy since the 1950s and provides approximately 100 full time, well-paying jobs.

The Kelly’s Mountain project would have created approximately 80 direct jobs for a half-century. However, the designation of the Kluscap Wilderness area over the proposed project area has forever blocked this from happening.

Nova Scotia Environment rates the Kluscap Wilderness Area’s mineral potential as only “medium” despite the well-known, major deposit on Kelly’s Mountain

If MANS’ proposed land swap mechanism were adopted, it could make it possible to swap out the protected land covering the Kelly’s Mountain deposit, and to create many new jobs for Cape Breton.

MANS is asking the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land by adding a “land swap” mechanism to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

Proposed land swaps would be fully regulated by the provincial government, on a case-by-case basis, to ensure there is a net benefit to the province. The government could even require that the land being swapped in by the company be larger and/or more ecologically valuable than the protected land being swapped out. This creates the potential to not only maintain but also improve the government’s portfolio of protected lands, creating a win-win for both the economy and the environment.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 Nova Scotians.

October 4, 2017
MANS LAUNCHES FOURTH YEAR OF THE "MINING ROCKS! VIDEO CONTEST"
OVER $8000 IN CASH PRIZES
Now that students have settled into the new school year, the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) is hoping to inspire junior high and high schools to get creative - and win big.

Today, MANS announced that the "Mining ROCKS! Video Contest" is back for a fourth year. The contest, which is open to all junior high and high school students in Nova Scotia, encourages kids to produce short videos about mining and quarrying. The winners in five different categories will each be awarded $1000, with $500 going to the runner-up.

"The videos can be about virtually any aspect of mining and quarrying, including its economic importance, environment and reclamation, historical facts and beneficial end-uses of mining products," said Sean Kirby, Executive Director. "And we encourage students to have fun with it - to be creative and make their video stand out from the crowd."

"This contest helps students gain a greater understanding of the importance and economic benefits of mining in our province," said Natural Resources Minister Margaret Miller. "As a judge, I look forward to seeing the creative ways that Nova Scotia's junior and senior high school students will express their ideas about the mining industry."

Students will upload their video to the MANS website and a panel of judges, who are mainly independent of the industry, will pick the winners for the Best Junior High School Video, Best High School Video, Best Comedy and Best 30-Second Commercial. The fifth category, the People's Choice winner, will be decided by the public through an online vote.

The judging panel includes Margaret Miller, Minister of Natural Resources, Membertou Chief Terry Paul, as well as several accomplished film and media professionals.

The deadline for video entries is February 23, 2018. In addition, students who get their videos in by January 5, 2018 will be entered into a draw to win two $250 "early bird" prizes.

For more information, go to http://NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca/contest

October 2017
MANS: PROTECT JOBS AND LAND
Mining industry calls for better balance in protected areas plan

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia is calling on the provincial government to strike a better balance between protecting jobs and protecting land.

“While Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry supports protecting natural lands for future generations, we also believe the provincial government’s Parks and Protected Areas Plan needs to strike a better balance between protecting land and protecting jobs,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of the Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS). “Beautiful, natural lands are important, but so are job creation, economic opportunity and government revenues to pay for programs such as health and education.”

MANS has just released a new report which shows that the Parks and Protected Areas Plan is potentially costing Nova Scotians approximately 291-356 jobs by preventing mineral exploration and development in protected areas. That is $16-$19.6 million per year in lost wages and $22-$27 million in foregone economic activity each year.

The Plan disproportionately harms some parts of the province. For example, Cape Breton contains 30 percent of the total amount of protected land in Nova Scotia, even though it only contains 19 percent of the province’s land mass. Also, Cape Breton has 154 known mineral occurrences that are overlapped by protected land, which makes it harder, or outright prevents, exploration and development of all that potential wealth.

Cumberland County has 51 overlaps between known mineral occurrences and protected land; Colchester has 43 overlaps; and Halifax County has 23. Across the province, 5.5 percent of all known mineral occurrences are overlapped.

The full report, entitled “A Better Balance: How we can protect jobs and land for Nova Scotians,” is available at: tmans.ca/protected-lands.

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia proposes a modest policy change that would strike a better balance between protecting both natural lands and economic opportunity.

A “land swap” mechanism should be added to the protected lands regulatory regime. This would allow mining and quarrying companies to access protected land by purchasing land of at least equal size and ecological value outside of the protected areas and arranging for it to be protected instead. This would ensure that the total amount of protected land remains the same or grows; the ecological value of protected lands remains the same or grows; and Nova Scotians would continue to be able to access the minerals they need to create jobs and grow the economy.

“While we all appreciate the importance and beauty of natural lands, and everyone wants to protect the environment, we also need to protect jobs and opportunity,” said Kirby. “A little flexibility in the Plan would help us find more new mines and create more jobs for Nova Scotians.”

Based on a plan established by the previous provincial government, Nova Scotia has already protected over 12 percent of the province’s land mass and the government intends to bring the total to 13 percent. This would put Nova Scotia in second place nationwide in removing land from economic usage, despite being the second smallest province and a province with some of the biggest economic and demographic challenges.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying employs 5500 Nova Scotians and generates $420 million per year in economic activity.

September 2017
MANS APPLAUDS BUDGET
Fuel tax rebate will create jobs for Nova Scotians

The Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) is pleased the new provincial government budget extends the fuel tax rebate to the mining and quarrying industry.

“The government said it would give our industry the same fuel tax rebate that other resource industries get, and we are delighted the budget keeps that promise," said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. "This will help our industry create jobs for Nova Scotians and make the province a more attractive place for mining companies to invest."

Provincial fuel tax is supposed to help pay for public roads and highways by charging the vehicle owners who use them. The government gives other resource industries a tax rebate for fuel used in vehicles that do not go on public roads, such as fishing boats, farm tractors and forestry harvesters. Nova Scotia does not currently give the rebate to the mining and quarrying industry even though most of the industry’s vehicles also do not use public roads.

The budget’s fuel tax rebate provision will save operators 15.5 cents per litre of fuel consumed on mine, quarry and pit sites. The savings, estimated to be $1.6 million in 2017-18, will be reinvested in Nova Scotia operations to make them more efficient and create jobs.

Nova Scotia’s mining and quarrying industry employs 5500 people and generates $420 million per year in economic activity.

March 6, 2017
AND THE WINNER IS….
Up to you
The deadline for entries into the Mining Association of Nova Scotia’s (MANS) “Mining ROCKS! Video Contest” has come and gone, and now it’s time to vote for your favorite video. The People’s Choice Award voting kicks off today and closes April 6, 2017.

“We asked junior high and high school kids to produce short videos about mining and quarrying and to have fun with it – to be creative and make their video stand out from the crowd,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “They certainly rose to the challenge. The entries are in and now it’s time for the public to decide which video is the People’s Choice.”

Videos were submitted to the contest by junior high and high school students from across Nova Scotia. The videos can be viewed and voted on at: http://notyourgrandfathersmining.ca/contest

All members of the public are invited to vote for the People’s Choice. You can vote for multiple videos, but you can only vote for each video once.

The winner of the People’s Choice category will receive $1000, and the runner-up will receive $500.

There are four other prize categories in addition to the People’s Choice: Best Junior High School Video, Best High School Video, Best Comedy and Best 30 Second Commercial. A panel of judges will pick the winners of these categories. The panel includes Lloyd Hines, Minister of Natural Resources, Membertou Chief Terry Paul, as well as accomplished film and media professionals.

The contest will award over $8000 in prizes in its third year.

January 20, 2017
MANS HANDS OUT “EARLY BIRD” PRIZES IN STUDENT VIDEO CONTEST
Two Lucky Students Get $250 Each
The Mining Association of Nova Scotia (MANS) today announced the winners of the “early bird” draw for the Mining ROCKS! Video Contest.

Nicole Dion of Lucasville and Jasmine Metzler of Middle Sackville are the lucky winners of $250 each. Nicole’s video is titled: Mining Matters, while Jasmine has entered two videos titled: A Rocky Interview and How much do YOU know?

“The Mining Rocks Video Contest is open to all junior high and high school students in Nova Scotia,” said Sean Kirby, Executive Director of MANS. “We are asking kids to produce short video about mining and quarrying and to have fun with it – to be creative and make their video stand out from the crowd. The final deadline is February 28 so there is still lots of time for students to enter.”

“I'm so excited to win the early bird prize!”, said Nicole. “It was really fun to make the video. I learned how mining is a lot more important in everyday life than I thought.”

“After I found out I won the early bird draw I was incredibly excited!”, said Jasmine. “I will be spending my money on filming equipment to make more educational films, about important topics such as mining!"

“Congratulations to Nicole, Jasmine and to all the students who are participating in the contest,” said Stephen Gough, MLA for Sackville-Beaverbank. “Mining is an important industry in Nova Scotia and it is great to see students learning about it through the contest.”

“It is great to see how creative and clever the students’ videos are,” said Ben Jessome, MLA for Hammonds Plains-Lucasville. “I encourage students across the province to take advantage of the contest and enter before the final deadline.”

Gough and Jessome, the MLAs for Millwood High School and Madeline Symonds Middle School respectively, will be delivering the checks to the students.

The videos are available at http://NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca/2017-submissions.

Students will upload their video to the MANS website and a panel of judges, who are mainly independent of the industry, will pick the winners for the Best Junior High School Video, Best High School Video, Best Comedy, and Best 30-Second Commercial. The judging panel includes Lloyd Hines, Minister of Natural Resources, Membertou Chief Terry Paul, several municipal wardens and accomplished film and media professionals.

The fifth category, the People’s Choice winner, will be decided by the public through an online vote. The winners in each category will be awarded $1000, with $500 going to the runner-ups.

For more information, go to http://NotYourGrandfathersMining.ca/contest